Bus Stop Review:

[This review contains spoilers]

Isn’t it wonderful when someone so horrible turns out to be so nice?

I’m paraphrasing, but Marilyn Monroe does utter a line remarkably similar to that. By the morals of this film, abduction is fine, stalking is acceptable and if you’re in love with a stranger, it justifies manhandling the hell out of them.

Marilyn plays the dumb blonde rather well, a woman without talent, that can’t sing but wants to make it in Hollywood. The scene where she sung went for too long and felt rather painful. Cherie, Marilyn’s character, is deemed an Angel by Bo, a man that seems to think you should treat a woman the same way you do a bull.

Tie them up and bring them home.

That’s not a joke, that’s how little respect and understanding he has for much of anyone. He’s brutish, and literally doesn’t behave until it’s literally beaten into him.

Then he’s sorry. Then he wants to play nice, and because Cherie is so dumb she believes him. Even though he proves moments later he had learned nothing, because he almost kidnapped his best friend.

Bo is a man child that doesn’t respect Cherie at all. He doesn’t even call her by name. Cherry, that’s her ‘new name’. One she doesn’t even want.

So, seeing a stranger and forcing them to marry you is romantic?

What a strange message. This isn’t a bad movie, the acting is good, but the plot is nonsensical. I mean, why would everyone just grin and wave while Cherie leaves with Bo? He’s crazy. She needs someone to take her aside and say: ‘Honey, you’re better than this.”

Which is really the message of the movie. It could’ve been better, instead we got this, a dumb mess.

Gentlemen Prefer Blondes Review:

[This review contains spoilers]

The title of this film is a lie. I swear that the brunette gets more guys looking at her than Marilyn Monroe (not that Jane Russell isn’t a looker herself). This film is actually pretty funny, as a comedy should be.

It has the two leading ladies continually getting themselves caught up in hijinks, from accusations of stealing a tiara to being investigated for a love affair. It’s nice seeing the two women play off each other, and being a little man crazy.

I liked that, it’s not something that I feel like I see often enough in films (maybe I’m not watching the right ones?). Regardless, this film has scenes with men parading around shirtless. Let it never be said that the 1950s didn’t have fanservice for the ladies.

I liked how the women played off each other, they were loyal and always back each other up, no matter the trouble they wound up in. The music was nice and playful, and the romance was well done.

Marylin’s character however has the oddest addiction to diamonds. Yet it did lead to a great musical number, one that’s become iconic and kept alive through people like Madonna. It’s a scene that has been replicated throughout the decades, it’s a nice scene, but not the best musical number of it’s time. Yet it is still good. It’s a great example of how they achieved spectacle in a time before CGI, with it’s great sets and dancing.

This is a pleasant film, that’s smarter than you’d think. Give it a shot on a lazy afternoon if you’re game.

Desk Set Review:

[This review contains spoilers]

This film honestly surprised me. It was meant to be a romantic comedy, instead I got a film that was a light hearted, and warm, office drama. I actually really enjoyed the surprise.

This story is about Bunny Watson (played by Katherine Hepburn) and Richard Sumner (Spencer Tracy) falling in love, despite her being in a rather one-sided relationship for seven years. Mike loves her, or so he says, but he is married to the business. She helps him with his work, enough to get him promoted and he expects her to drop everything. Just because he has now decided he wants to marry her.

He had no respect for her, and it’s a point emphasised by the film. Hell, Bunny is described as an old jacket by her friend Peg, to be used at his convenience.

Which I think shows a contrast to Sumner. He always treats her nicely, and though for the majority of the film you think he’s going to get her fired because of a ‘mechanical brain’ (a giant computer basically), there is no bitterness there. They become close, and there is genuine chemistry between them. However the romance took a back seat to what really set this film apart. The characters.

They’re all incredibly sweet. They have great banter. There isn’t really a dull moment in my mind. They think they’ll be fire because of a machine, a problem that plagues modern society today. I thought it was handled rather well, despite the machine being larger than half the room. The themes of displacement and distress. That’s realistic.

The relationships between the women felt real, as if they were family. They truly had each others back. They cared for each other. That’s what made the film for me, the human connection.

I know that sounds cheesy, but I appreciated it for that. It is a slow film, so it won’t be for everyone. But I liked that this was a film that explored themes that I didn’t expect of it. Even if it did have a happy ending, showing that the machine didn’t erase their jobs, and that even machines can ‘make mistakes’. I enjoyed that.

Though it did mention some people did get fired due to a similar machine in the payroll department. It just shows that despite it’s loving message of the unfailing human spirit, sometimes society will have upheaval due to new technology. Is that a good thing? Well, that’s beyond the scope of this film and this review.

I’d say watch the film, because it certainly has my vote.

All About Eve Review:

[This Review Contains Spoilers]

This film reminds of Sunset Boulevard, both films came out in the same year, touching on very similar themes. Mainly, abusive relationships and manipulative women. They have different takes on the same subject.

Sunset Boulevard, the main character is killed rather dramatically by a woman. She tried to keep that man the way a spider clings to a fly. Yet in some ways didn’t even mean to do it (you could argue), due to her mental instability.

All About Eve is far more purposeful and you’re not even sure where it’s going to begin with. Eve seems to be the perfect loyal fan to Margo (a great Broadway star). She takes care of everything, studying her, almost as if to become her. It feels creepy, but innocent to begin with.

Margo catches on long before her friends do, and they then declare her paranoid. She even briefly loses her boyfriend, Bill, over the incident.

She becomes angry, suspicious and a woman scorned.

Bette Davis adds such a vulnerability to Margo through her performance, it’s beyond commendable. The emotions that play on her face, the nuances, the way she can move from one feeling to the next. It’s fantastic and one of the most important reasons to watch this film.

Another is to see Marilyn Monroe early in her career. It’s interesting because she isn’t the draw of this film but you see the early glimmers of what makes her one later in her life. She had a winning smile and it’s nice watching her knowing what she later becomes.

Anne Baxter was great as Eve. The character played nice, the victim, the ‘lost lamb’ until her mask slips. She’s a bitch that’ll do anything to be a star, and that’s what she becomes. Ironically not understanding when the same process of physiological exploitation begins on her at the end of the film.

The best part about this film is the writing, it’s just so damn good. When the characters are spending time with each other, they act just like old friends do. The dialogue is perfect in scenes like that. I loved almost every written line, because they were clever, even witty.

In the end of the film Eve wins a trophy, all Margo says to her is: “Nice speech, Eve. But I wouldn’t worry too much about your heart. You can always put that award where your heart ought to be.”

It’s great. I loved it. A very satisfying line and film.

The ultimate problem I had with it is how some of the women are treated. Eve is a terrible person, but she gets slapped by Addison, a man that knows all her secrets. He declares that she belongs to him. That came across as harsh, then again maybe that’s the point of the film? That there are ‘villains’ everywhere. I’m not sure. He also seemingly abandons her at the end of the film, it’s odd and doesn’t make much sense. Perhaps a bit of irony?

Regardless, I still think it’s a great picture. It’s awesome watching Eve use everyone in Margo’s life for her own benefit only for it to blow up on her. I still love this film and think it’s worth a watch. A true classic.

An American in Paris Review:

[This review contains spoilers]

When an old fashioned American musical comes to mind, this is essentially the type of movie you get. Not La La Land.

Now La La Land had great acting and cinematography; but the musical numbers floundered. Due mainly to the main actors singing and dancing. They’re no Gene Kelly, and damn it if that man can’t dance!

He does an excellent job in this film. He’s likeable, charming, with the right amount of wit. Just like the rest of this film. This isn’t one for everyone, if you don’t like musicals, dancing or good clean fun, this isn’t for you. It’s really old fashioned, but honestly, I found it refreshing.

It’s about a man that falls in love with a girl, they can’t be together for one reason or another, then they end the film in an embrace. All is right with the world! It’s cheesy and silly, but nice.

It’s a very typical film that way. What isn’t are these strange moments when the film can become quite surreal. The best example is near the end of the film where it feels like your watching a theatre ballet of sorts. They’re are heaps of dancers, the chorography is just great. It feels dramatic and grand. The shots are carefully taken, your not really sure what’s happening, but I loved it regardless.

Did it make much sense to the film as a whole? Maybe not, but it felt important and symbolic. It could’ve been it’s own separate short film, like someone inserted their experimental art piece in the middle of a standard musical flick.

Whatever the case, I’m glad it was there, because it was just that well done.

The film overall has great music, good dancing.

I felt like Leslie Caron, though a great dancer, was rather weak in her role as the main love interest. I also found the romance to not be believable. Yes, they like each other. But Gene Kelly’s character, Mulligan, almost had a stalker-ish vibe to him in the beginning. It was odd.

There are other characters that just get their hearts broken. It’s a little sad really, but then again that’s life, and somewhat realistic. Love never was fair.

I just want to quote one of my favourite parts of the film:

“That’s… quite a dress you almost have on.”

“Thanks.”

“What holds it up?”

Modesty.”

That’s the type of good dialogue that keeps the story interesting, even though the film does have it’s slow points. Ironically those lines above weren’t even said by Ms. Caron, but by Nina Foch. I feel like Ms. Foch was wasted and under utilised in this film, because she stole every scene she was in. She holds her own against Mr. Kelly, and I look forward to watching her more in the future.

This isn’t a film for everyone. It’s a classic. It’s a 1950s American film. You’ll know whether you want to see it or not. I, however, fully recommend it.